PATRIOT SURVEY SAYS!

 
There is nothing like returning to a place that remains unchanged to find the ways in which you yourself have altered.
— Nelson Mandela
PATRIOT: One who loves his or her country and supports its authority and interests.
— Merriam-Webster
 

The origins of the Multinational Patriot Flag & Blog series began many years ago, as I observed my father with a conflicted sense of "patriotism." I worked through attempts at honoring all facets of my heritage, but as an adult, I was struck by how the "American" flag was predominately used by people with a very narrow view of patriotism. (Read more here.) With this platform, we aim to reimagine "patriot" one multinational story and two flags at a time by honoring both our personal and ancestral heritage. 

Share your Multinational Patriot story with us by completing our questionnaire, "PATRIOT SURVEY SAYS!!!" You may complete the survey below via our online form or by emailing your answers to us at connect(at)carbon-fibre.me. 

If you are short on time but would still like to participate, email us a picture that captures the merging (or clashing) of your cultures with a descriptive caption and we will include it in our blog series. Please note that by participating in our survey and blog series, you are accepting our terms and conditions

Thank you for your interest! We look forward to your responses!

~ Onjena Yo

#MultinationalPATRIOT #HonorBOTH #OurPatriotism


PATRIOT SURVEY SAYS!!!

Please note that your answers will not be saved until you submit the form. Not all questions are required. A text format of the questions are provided below for your convenience. 

A. NAME(s)/MEANING:
B. WHAT DOES YOUR NAME AUTOCORRECT TO?
C. NICKNAME(s)/BACKSTORY:
D. SUPERHERO NAME/BACKSTORY:
A. DISH(ES):
B. PHRASE(S)/SLANG (You can provide both original and English translation):
C. QUOTE(S) (You can provide both original and English translation):
D. WORD(S) THAT CANNOT BE TRANSLATED TO ENGLISH:
E. SONG(S)/ARTIST(S):
F. BOOK(S)/AUTHOR(S):
A. USA:
B. YOUR "OTHER" COUNTRY:
C. YOUR EXPERIENCE IN THE UNITED STATES:
D. HOME:
A. NATIONAL MOTTO: In God We Trust
B. NATIONAL BIRD: Bald Eagle
C. NATIONAL ANTHEM: Star Spangled Banner

PATRIOT SURVEY SAYS!!!

Survey questions are provided in text format below so you may answer at your leisure. Please email your response to us at connect(at)carbon-fibre.me

I. What's in your name?

A. First and/or Family Name/Meaning:

B. What does your name autocorrect to?

C. Nickname/Backstory:

D. Superhero Name/Backstory:

II. Country(ies) of Origin/Residence:

III. States/Regions Lived/Visited in the United States:

IV. Language(s) Spoken:

V. Favorites:

A. Dish(es):

B. Phrase(s)/Slang (You can provide both original and English translations):

C. Quote(s):

D. Word(s) that cannot be translated to English:

E. Favorite Song(s)/Artist(s):

F. Favorite Book(s)/Author(s):

VI. Three words to describe each of the following:

A. USA:

B. Your "other" country:

C. Your experience in the United States:   

D. Home:

VII. Which nationalities/cultures do you represent?

VIII. Where do people assume/guess you are from?

IX. What is the most "creative" way (positive or negative) someone has expressed themselves to you with regard to your nationalities/cultures?

X. What are the biggest differences between your nationalities/cultures?

XI. What are the biggest similarities between your nationalities/cultures?

XII. Share your experience/observations returning to your country after living in the U.S.:

XIII. Share your experience/observations returning to the U.S. after travelling/living abroad:

XIV. Share your experience/observations travelling to different regions within the USA:

XV. Share some accurate/inaccurate and lesser known stereotypes of "Americans" and your "other" nationalities/culture(s):

XVI. How do you define patriot/patriotism?

XVII. What does it mean to be an “American” to you? Did you have a moment when you realized you were or weren't "American"? Did you have a parallel moment in your "other" country? Please share:

XVIII. How would elders in your "other" country define an “American”?

XIX. How would the youth in your "other" country define an “American”?

XX. What “American” qualities/traits do you most admire?

XXI. What “American” qualities/traits do you least admire?

XXII. What makes a country exceptional?

XXIII. What is the "American Dream" to you? How has it changed? What should it be?

XXIV. When you watch international competitions like the Olympics or the World Cup, who do you root for?

XXV. In which countries have you visited a McDonalds or Starbucks (or other popular U.S. chain)? Any interesting observations?

XXVI. Favorite country/place you have visited or lived or want to visit/live? And why?

XXVII. Share a significant memory(ies) involving one/all of your nationalities/cultures.

XXVIII. How has living in the United States impacted/influenced you?

XXIX. What does "assimilation" mean to you? What does "passing" mean to you?

XXX. If the United States was "reborn" today, how would you change the following:

A. National Motto ["In God We Trust"]:

B. National Bird ["Bald Eagle"]:

C. National Anthem ["Star Spangled Banner"]:

BONUS: Which would you rather have named after you... a mountain or a theory? Why?


HALF, HAPA, MIXED, ONE DROP & ANTI-BLACKNESS: 100% Human

As children, our father used to take my siblings and I to the annual Dayton African American Cultural Festival (DAACF). I remember buying my first Africa-inspired jewelry... a red, black and green continent of Africa on a black leather cord. I think it had beads. I also remember being timid about wearing it in public. I longed to own a "100% Black Queen" t-shirt or a variation that I spotted at the festival, but I was worried that I would be called out as a poser or a fraud. It was the "100%" that troubled me as a child of a Black man and a Korean woman. My young mind couldn't reconcile what I believed was the exclusion of my Korean heritage from the celebration of my Black pride. Our father taught us that we were Black, regardless of what society labeled us. And though I secretly wished that I was 100% Black, the Africa-necklace stayed in my jewelry box and I never asked my daddy to buy me the "100% Black Queen" t-shirt. 

OMMA & DADDY

OMMA & DADDY

My story is not unique. In elementary school, when taking standardized tests, I was sometimes forced to choose a race or instructed to "check all that apply." When I did have to choose one, my teachers and my parents said I had to choose Black. When I was teased by other children, it was because of my "slanty eyes", so Black felt safe...it felt strong. By the time I got to college, I was more militant than mild, to the point that my dad asked that I "tone it down," at least in public. Another layered lesson.  

Years later, with the rise of social media, it became easy to connect with others who shared a similar heritage. At first, it was exciting to connect and swap stories of our bi-racial, bi-cultural experiences. It was a bittersweet mix of experiences... of immigrant parents worried their children wouldn't assimilate and find success in America... shame from not being able to speak our Mother tongue... unique blends of soul/seoul food at family meals... the embracing of our labels of "half" or "hapa"... Then I noticed how some of my fellow "Blasians" felt that by being "mixed" they were somehow the envy of all others. Just enough drops of Black, but not too much cause good hair and all. 

LAURYN HILL

LAURYN HILL

Well, damn. Should I spoil the party and tell them that the "hateration" they feel may not be because of jealousy but due to their anti-blackness and self-hatred? That being called "exotic" was not necessarily the compliment they thought it was...? I did not want to confront the anti-blackness of my Black friends, regardless of their percentage of Blackness. I was not equipped and I was tired, so I pulled back.

 
How you gon’ win when you ain’t right within
How you gon’ win when you ain’t right within
How you gon’ win when you ain’t right within
Come again
Come again, come again, come again, come again
— Lauryn Hill, Lyrics from "Doo Wop (That Thing)"
H/T @DVRYSTER & @THELLAG

H/T @DVRYSTER & @THELLAG

Fortunately, I've discovered some thought-leaders who are working hard to combat anti-blackness and white supremacy in the Asian community, among other battles: 

If you have more to add, please let me know via twitter @onjena

 

So, what have I learned? I am not required to choose. I am 100% human. 

And... I can say it loud. You don't have to be Black to celebrate Blackness. What the hell is 100% Black anyway? No, seriously, is there a test? Do we get a certificate? Is that what the race card is for? Or maybe, the 100% is about keeping it real.

FUTURE TOPICS: Celebrating vs Appropriating Blackness. Queen/King/Monarchy/Imperialist/Colonial shit must end. 

~ Onjena Yo


Share your #MultinationalPATRIOT story with us by participating in our PATRIOT SURVEY SAYS!!! blog series. Click the pic below to learn how to share your story! 

MURICAN AMERICANS: Texans, Arizonans, Alaskans and More

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After a few early participants completed our Patriot Survey, we realized that there was more to explore with the meaning of a "patriot" within America...

What drives one's sense of patriotism? Proximity to a border? Championship sports teams? Birthright?

Share with us on twitter @MultiPATRIOT

WWW.MURICA.MULTINATIONALPATRIOT.COM

#MultinationalPatriot #HonorBoth #OurPatriotism

 

We started "Murican flags" with the following states, cities and affiliations: 

Designs available exclusively on Redbubble

WWW.SHOP.MURICA.MULTINATIONALPATRIOT.COM

Don't see your flag? Tweet us @MultiPATRIOT

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Designed by Onjena Yo

SAY IT LOUD: Black Power in Every Language by Onjena Yo

These concepts have evolved over many late night conversations... born out of pain and love and laughter. As a Black woman and a Spanish language teacher, it was quite natural that my sister would translate "Say it loud, I'm Black and I'm proud" to Spanish. This and that 30 Rock episode starring Tracy Morgan, prompted me to research how to say "Black" in every language.

I’ve learned the word ‘black’ in every language, just so I know when to be offended. Russian “tcherny,” Korean “heug-in [hooking],” dolphin “eeee eeee eee eeee.”
— Tracy Jordan, 30 Rock: Season 4: Episode 17

Source: UnlikelyWords.com [*hooking edited to "heug-in" or "흑인"]

I came across an abundance of enthusiastic databases of ethnic slurs (for the sake of academic research, of course..). Digging a little deeper, I found that Black people were often called a term that was rooted in racist etymology by the "majority" of that country (e.g., derivative of slave, non-believer). I was on the hunt for what we called ourselves around the globe...a color in some cases... a tribe in others. The time frame deliberately spanned beyond the "transatlantic slave" era. This activity led me inward to a memory of my father, who, during parent's weekend, drove around my small New England college campus blasting James Brown's song, "Say it loud, I'm Black and I'm proud!" I've only begun to scratch the surface on what identifying and celebrating Blackness means to me, as an American, as a woman and as a person raised in a third culture *mix of Black and Korean.

Our translation of "Black" in our "Black in Every Language" design: 

Black – English
Negro – Spanish
Noir – French
Nwa – Haitian Creole
Oji – Igbo
Dudu – Yoruba
Preta – Portuguese
Nyeusi – Swahili

Whatever the language, we encourage all to #sayitLOUD! We would love to hear your thoughts! Connect with us on twitter at @MultiPATRIOT or @populistdemand

OUR DADDY

OUR DADDY

Thank you for your time.

~ Onjena Yo

[For the folks in the cheap seats passing notes, you can be proud, too... Black is beautiful, too... Black lives matter, too... Black girls rock, too... but it ain't always about you, too...]

 


BLACK: SAY IT LOUD Design Series by Onjena Yo

Sold exclusively on Redbubble

WWW.ARISE.POPULISTDEMAND.ORG


SAY IT LOUD:

ARABIC: 'AQUL DHLK BISAWT EAL

FRENCH: DIS LE BRUYANT

HAITIAN: DI LI BYEN FȮ

IGBO: EKWU YA OKÉ

PORTUGUESE: DIGA ALTO

SPANISH: DILO ALTO

SWAHILI: SEMA NI KUBWA

TAGALOG: SABIHIN MO MALAKAS

YORUBA: SO Ọ TI NPARIWO

 

 

I'M BLACK:

'ANA 'ASWAD 

JE SUIS NOIR

MWEN NWA

ADḷ M OJI

EU SOU PRETA

SOY NEGRO

MIṂI NYEUSI

AKO ITIM

DUDU NI MI

 

AND I'M PROUD:

WA'ANA FAKHUR

ET JE SUIS FIER

AK MWEN FYĖ

NA ABU M MPAKO

E TENHO ORGULHO

Y SOY ORGULLOSO

NA MIṂI MPAKO

AT AKO MAIPAGMAMALAKI

ATI EMI LI AGBERAGA


Do you speak any of the above languages? How did we do on our translations? Want to add a new language? 

Let us know via twitter @MultiPATRIOT & @populistdemand


Designed by Onjena Yo

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